Counterpoint: Scooby-Doo Is Not Dumb

My colleague, “esteemed” film vit Matt Singer, considers Scooby-Doo is dumb. I realize this because he composed an article about it. You can read that article here, though I suggest you don’t — you’ll just be wasting your period, because Scooby-Doo is not idiotic. Yes, the new DC Comics’ “revitalization” of the classic Hanna-Barbera cartoon

My colleague, “esteemed” film vit Matt Singer, considers Scooby-Doo is dumb. I realize this because he composed an article about it. You can read that article here, though I suggest you don’t — you’ll just be wasting your period, because Scooby-Doo is not idiotic.

Yes, the new DC Comics’ “revitalization” of the classic Hanna-Barbera cartoon personas (which includes a modern machine of Scooby-Doo featuring Shaggy like a tattoo-sleeved, handlebar-mustachioed hipster and Scooby as a tech-savvy puppy wearing some cartoon iteration of Yahoo Glass) is idiotic; there is no defending that will. Kids will not attention any more about Scooby-Doo today, now that Velma flies the drone, than they did this morning. There is no sense throughout trying to make Scooby-Doo cool, mainly because Scooby-Doo was never cool, and that’s why it was cool.

The original line, Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!, was published in 1969 and still continues to be the gold standard of all the subsequent iterations. While Shiny is right that the videos were only mysteries to the brain dead in the audience, the Scooby-Doo episodes were not unique for their whodunit plot creativities, but for their bad guys. Scooby-Doo was not a successful private eye series, but it was highly successful as being a monster-of-the-week kiddie horror cartoon.

For nerds like me, enjoying Scooby-Doo as a kid seemed to be one of the only ways to get this fix. There was not many other shows that put a stoner with the exceptional dog up against ghosts, zombies, phantoms, witches and nasty clowns. Some times they even developed their own mythology, like the big, glowing owl creature referred to as Willawaw. As adults, this could seem awfully cartoonish, nevertheless for a show geared towards elementary school kids, that is some heavy things.

I still remember several of my earliest worries came from Scooby-Doo episodes. There’utes the episode wherever Scoob and the gang stop by an abandon movie theater haunted by a phantom puppeteer. There’s an existing guy sleeping, they try to nudge him or her awake and his head falls off. Or whenever, in Nowhere in order to Hyde, the creepy Mr. Hyde type monster, is hiding in the back of this Mystery Machine. There’utes the cackling, space huge. Or, the Creepy Heap From the Deep that is trying to rob the souls on the Mystery Inc. team. The KISS-inspired, flame-haired, glam stone phantom?!

Yes, Scooby-Doo is goofy, on occasion overwhelmingly so, however Shaggy eating a massive sub or the gang getting out of a defrosted caveman with a Monkees ripoff was there in order to counterbalance the fact that the main characters were being pursued and abducted simply by monsters. This was some sort of kids show all things considered, one that was striking enough to include critters (and a stoner) in every instance, and the goofiness of the cases helped dull some of the scarier aspects of the actual show. And besides, this is a cartoon; exactly who says it has to stick to all the laws regarding physics? Wile E. Coyote can easily fall off a clf, but Shaggy’s unacceptable to hide under a large turtle shell?

At a time when a great deal of the content for children has been sanitized to the point of finding out lessons (even in the particular 80s, when Scooby-Doo re-emerged straight into pop culture, cartoons like G.I. Joe and He-Man, involved post-credits scenes that trained about not going swimming during a thunderstorm and also the important of not necessarily telling strangers your name), Scooby-Doo was refreshingly cool having scaring the garbage out of kids.

I will probably cop to the fact that Scooby-Doo eventually lost its means after Where Do you think you’re! and the introduction regarding Scooby’s relatives — Scrappy, Scooby-Dumm and also Scooby-Dee — was a step in the wrong direction. Although, you can’t determine the entire Scooby-Doo franchise over a handful of characters that only showed up in a few iterations. That would be just like saying The Fantastic Four suck, because there was a bad run of movies and characters such as H.E.Third.B.I.E. There are many ongoing businesses that have had straight down years, bad storylines and crappy characters throughout its run, but to say the full franchise is not smart because of it, is a vast generalization that ignores every one of the good the collection ever had. Matt claims, “each subsequent sequel got even dumber,” but one of the modern Scooby-Doo collection, Mystery Incorporated, is a prime demonstration of how to modernize an existing cartoon without pandering to hipster ideas like drones in addition to tattoos.

Scooby-Doo might not be earning any awards creative expression, but as the kids show from the 60s, it was remarkably progressive and satisfying enough to keep alone around over 4 decades later. For budding monster movie geeks growing up in the Nineteen seventies and 80s, it had been an essential part of our upbringing.

The defense rests.

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